Tag Archives: A46

Pamington Lane Development: Latest news & comment

Starveall 10The Application for the Pamington Lane development finally reached the Planning Committee at Tewkesbury Borough Council at its Meeting this morning.

During a debate which lasted well over an hour, many of the Committee Members discussed the Plans and there was significant agreement with many of the points that I raised on behalf of Residents when I spoke.

Despite many additional points being raised by Committee Members about the clear lack of joined-up thinking in terms of the impact that all of the developments along the A46 are going to have on a road network, which is already far too busy, it became clear that because none of the organisations or agencies such as Gloucestershire Highways or the Highways Agency have raised any objections, there was – in planning terms – no robust reason for the Committee to refuse.

The Committee voted to permit the Application – under delegated authority – on a margin of 7 votes to 6.

I have since been made aware by Residents who attended and were watching from the Public Gallery, that Members who during the debate said that they would not support the Application going ahead, actually didn’t vote – or ‘sat on their hands’.

Sadly, the fact remains that the Joint Core Strategy which arguably prioritised Cheltenham and Gloucester’s development needs way above those of people who live in Tewkesbury Borough, has failed Pamington even before it has been rubber stamped by the Government.

We can only hope that no more significant development applications are submitted from within the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward – even in outline form – before the Secretary of State reaches a decision – hopefully be in the Autumn. Otherwise, these too are likely to be built without any real regard to the wider impact that they will have on our Community.

Many additional houses will also be built which were never projected within the JCS Plans. These are extra homes that will almost certainly only be added to the significant number of houses already set to be developed, rather than be included within.

We should perhaps not forget that the number of houses now planned for development in Tewkesbury Borough would never have been so high in the first place if we had developed a Strategy for Tewkesbury on its own, during a process which would clearly have been much shorter. By now, it will almost certainly have been complete and in all likelihood have prevented the Pamington Lane Development from going ahead.

Who should we thank for that?

Pamington Lane Development: Petition to stop additional traffic through the Village

photo 2In the conversations I have been having with Residents, it is clear that there is concern that the potential rise in traffic which would come from new homes at this site would be considerable, bearing in mind that many journeys from the site are likely to be made to Bishops Cleeve, Cheltenham and further afield following the A435 South, or alternatively Eastwards along the A46 for Stow, Evesham and again further, avoiding the junction by Ashchurch Camp.

I have already raised this point directly with Gloucestershire Highways during the Consultation Period and know that these concerns are widely shared. However, I do intend to raise it again when I intend to speak at the TBC Planning Meeting on Tuesday 3rd March when the Application will be going to the Committee for Determination.

I have today been asked to publicise a new online petition which has been set up, asking Tewkesbury Borough Council to consider the impact of the proposed Pamington Lane development on traffic through the Village when the Planning Committee makes its decision on the Application.

If you would like to support the Petition, please click here.

The Application can be found on the TBC Planning Portal using Planning Reference 14/00972/OUT.

 

Links to Adam’s Blogs about this proposed Development:

Pamington Lane Development: Planning Application Update

Pamington Development Application: Your views on Access Options

Pamington: Planning Application for 150 Homes off Pamington Lane

Pamington Lane Development: No benefit to Residents – just commercial opportunism

 

Pamington Lane Development: Planning Application Update

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I have just received the List for the Applications which will be considered at the next Meeting of Tewkesbury Borough Council’s Planning Committee, which will be held at 9.00am on Tuesday 3rd March 2015, at the Council Offices, Gloucester Road, Tewkesbury.

The Application concerning the Pamington Lane development (Linden Homes) is listed – Ref 14/00972/OUT and is likely to be considered immediately after both of the outstanding Applications which relate to the unauthorised construction at Starveall Farm – Ref 14/00873/APP (For the dwelling) and Ref 14/00770/FUL (for the additional farm buildings).

From the notes I have been given, I understand that the Officer Recommendation for the Application (which is for Outline Permission) is to Permit.

(Please note that Officer Recommendations may not reflect the decision of the Planning Committee on the day.)

I hope to speak at the Planning Meeting when all these Applications are considered and intend to reflect the comments and concerns that have been raised with me about the proposal and its impact on Pamington and the local area when I do.

If you have anything that you would like to bring to my attention that you believe you may not have already done so concerning this Application, please do e-mail me on councillor.tugwell@tewkesbury.gov.uk .

The Planning Meeting will be open to the general public and seating is available in the Public Gallery. Please go to Reception when you arrive, if you are planning to attend.

 

Pamington Development Application: Your views on Access Options

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A number of Pamington Residents have already contacted me to discuss their thoughts on access to the Proposed Development off Pamington Lane, and its potential impact on traffic in the Village.

Road Safety on Pamington Lane is an ongoing issue for local people. It is a problem which has featured heavily in Planning Applications, in discussions and in complaints over its use as a rush-hour cut through, and the speeds that drivers travel.

With this in mind, I am sure that many will be pleased to hear that Gloucestershire County Council (GCC) have contacted Ashchurch Rural Parish Council this week and want to consider local opinion on options, prior to submitting their recommendation to Tewkesbury Borough’s Planning Department before a decision on the Application is then made.

GCC are looking for a response from the Parish very quickly. For this reason, I have asked for and received the permission of the Council to publish the message they received, so that as much feedback as possible can be passed back to GCC before they make their submission. The main points/questions of the note received on Wednesday are as follows:

[We are] reviewing this application on behalf of Gloucestershire County Council highway authority, looking at the local road impact, the Highways Agency will be assessing the impact on the A46.

You will be aware that the developer is proposing to alter the priority of Pamington Lane in order to discourage rat running, see attached plan (please click here – Pamington Lane), I would welcome the PC’s view on this matter, without prejudice to the comments made on the application by APC. If permission is granted with a highway scheme as shown, that scheme cannot be altered at a later date, therefore I would recommend that input is provided at this stage, so that alterations could be made to the scheme in the event that permission is granted. Based on the developer’s plans there are two options:

1. Alter the priority of Pamington Lane as shown on plan. This may to some extent discourage rat running, however it will also mean that existing residents will have to give way on Pamington Lane where they have not in the past. The re-alignment will also help to reduce vehicle speeds by breaking up the relatively long and straight road, with a give way junction.
2. Maintain Pamington Lane as the priority route and have the proposed development arm to the west of Pamington Lane as the give way arm. Existing residents will not be inconvenienced by having to give way on Pamington Lane, however rat running will not be discouraged, and with a wider Pamington Lane carriageway as proposed by the developer (5.5m), vehicle speeds could increase. Potentially traffic calming could be considered to discourage rat running if option 2 is the preferred option.

I would welcome your thoughts on this matter by the 14th January at the latest.

As you can see, the timescale is very short. So if you would like to let me know which – if any – of the options you would prefer – along with any other brief points you may have, could I ask that you e-mail me on councillor.tugwell@tewkesbury.gov.uk by no later than 9.30 am on Tuesday (13th January 2015). I will then pass on the information that I have both to the Parish Council and GCC.

It is important to note that giving your views on the options will not be considered as support for the Application. The decision still rests within the Planning Process and consent is by no means guaranteed at any stage.

I remain of the view that this Proposed Development (TBC Ref: 14/00972/OUT) is not in the best interests of the Ward and that the Joint Core Strategy (JCS) Strategic Allocation for Ashchurch already places an excessive development burden on the area, before any of the additional proposals that we are aware of are considered. However, if this development should be approved either by TBC’s Planning Committee or at some further stage, I also accept that it is vital that the Community and its Representatives have done everything possible to influence the best outcomes for the future which are possible in the circumstances.

The plan attached with the note can again be downloaded by clicking this link: Pamington Lane

 

The Joint Core Strategy now reaches the Government stage this Thursday. But what happens while we wait for the Autumn 2015 Report and why wasn’t it avoided?

I would like to thank everyone who has taken the time over the last weekend and early part of this week to send e-mails to Members of Tewkesbury Borough Council concerning the Joint Core Strategy process.

The concerns raised are not lost on me in any sense. Many should have already been taken into consideration and acted upon within the JCS programme which is now being handed to the Government for final review on the 20th of November.

Many of you were hoping for change. But the very frustrating part of all this has been that the decisions that really counted were taken over a year ago.

Once a majority of Members voted the project through in early September 2013, no matter what consultations and processes have taken place since, that was basically the whole thing done and dusted, seemingly without any hope of change, unless it were to be rejected at the stage where it is submitted to the Secretary of State.

This itself is extremely unlikely. The whole JCS Process, rather like applications going through the Planning Process itself has been conducted very much as a tick-box exercise.

The modus operandi has been squarely focused upon the requirements placed upon Local Authorities by Central Government and any flexibility which might come from the interpretation which that may have allowed, has almost certainly always been used to facilitate and sure-up the three-way arrangement between Cheltenham, Gloucester and Tewkesbury which myself and other Members have long since argued has been anything but in the best interests of the people that we as Ward Councillors – and collectively as a Council – represent.

Our voices fell on deaf ears and the practical implications of what is a flawed process and three-Authority-Strategy have been manifesting in the shape of all of the ‘lightning’ developments which have either reached Application stage or are in the processes of doing so, that involve building on land which is not even included within the JCS Strategic Allocation(s). This itself is set to continue until such time as the JCS is formally approved; the Report on which is itself not due until Autumn 2015.

Put the prospect of the developments which could receive consent in the next 12 months to one side, and right around the Borough, there is clearly massive concern about the realities of rubber stamping a long-term Planning Strategy which will effectively give a green light to developers to build across a 20+ year development allocation that will see much of our beautiful landscape and Villages changed forever – when as a Borough, we are and were simply at no stage obliged to make anything remotely like such a commitment.

These kinds of concerns are no less prevalent in the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward and are probably more so. We are currently witnessing developers looking to build almost everywhere along the A46 apart from the JCS Strategic Allocation in and around the Ashchurch Camp site itself and this doesn’t consider other areas that fall behind the Camp and will no doubt have a significant impact on Northway too.

Nobody should be under any illusion that a combination of the state of the Planning System today and the avoidable time that the JCS has taken – rather than pursuing a much better and wholly expedient Policy just for the Borough – potentially makes such Applications very difficult to stop. In this specific instance alone, it now threatens the very identities of Aston-on Carrant, Aston Cross, Ashchurch and Pamington as independent communities and Villages.

People from outside both the working and political environments of Local Authorities do see the inability of the Planning System to police and enforce the very Policies they have in place, irrespective of whether it is due to the ability of a higher power to override any local decision at a higher level, or whether there simply isn’t the money available in the local public purse to pursue developers who seem to have bottomless pits for pockets where making money is concerned.

Locally, we have already witnessed one company having developed and put into use an industrial sized chicken production unit at Starveall without Planning Consent for a large part of it, once it had Consent for the initial Plan. It is more than regrettable that nobody really knows what might now lie ahead, once the JCS has been put firmly in place.

It is simply wrong that the views of local people are being ignored and where they have not spoken, that their best interests now and for the future are not being considered as they should, by all of the people who are elected to represent them.

Nonetheless, everything you all have to say and how you feel is still important, even if it doesn’t influence a decision the way you might like to see it go this time.

Keep registering your comments, objections and even support for developments – where they will benefit your Community – by contacting your Local Planning Authority and getting them recorded.

Being able to say ‘I told you so’ wont help anybody and certainly wont turn the clock back. But evidence of the strength of your feeling and the reasons why you feel that way certainly does have the ability to influence future decisions.

Better still, it could at some point help those of us who really care to change the System and benefit us all.

 

How much more development in Ashchurch before the traffic problems are taken seriously?

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Traffic on the A46 at Ashchurch near Junction 9 of the M5, July 2014

With the Joint Core Strategy’s (JCS) final Public Consultation Phase only having began earlier this week, it really seems quite incredible that a Developer has already began moves towards building over 500 homes and a School on the Northern side of Ashchurch Camp.

Earmarked as part of the JCS Strategic Allocation which includes the Camp, comments suggesting that the Developer concerned may have jumped the gun are already well in circulation. However, it could be asked if this Plan gives a better illustration of the approach which nearly all commercial developers are employing, and one which certainly doesn’t fit with phrases they use to describe their plans in their publicity brochures, such as ‘homes which are much needed by the community’. This does after all come hot on the heels of two other developments in the immediate vicinity which will themselves supply around 300 new homes in the Ashchurch Rural Parish – and which without the JCS being formally ‘rubber stamped’ are regrettably no less likely to go ahead.

So even without the 2000 or more homes earmarked for the Ashchurch Camp at some point between now and 2030, just this Parish alone stands to absorb the better part of a thousand homes with not even the merest hint of comparable job creation in the area of a kind which would necessitate even a fraction of this level of development in the immediate area any time soon.

Sadly, this can only lead people living around the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward to conclude that these homes – if built – will be occupied by commuters who will most likely have 2 cars per household, thereby adding around perhaps 1500 cars to either the A46, the B4079, the roads around Northway or in fact all of them each morning, evening and basically any other time.

Many Residents are already feeling dumbstruck by the quick-fire succession of opportunist Developments along the A46. With an even bigger one that nobody had expected to hear sight nor sound of until the fate of the Camp was definitely known, now on the cards, it is the realities which surround the traffic problems on the A46 which are causing universal concern.

At Monday evening’s Meeting of Ashchurch Rural Parish Council’s Planning Committee, the Developer now carrying out consultation on building 45 homes South of Ashchurch Village was more than happy that the Highways Agency had expressed no concern with regard to the impact their plans would have on the A46, despite the experiences that many of us have almost daily.

With the Representatives present stating to the Council that they had been advised their Plans would have no excessive impact on the capacity of the road network – basically an indication that Highways Officials believe the roads can take more traffic without any major change – it is perhaps little wonder that Developers are apparently falling over themselves to get their Projects built before they find themselves having to contribute to what will at some point become a very expensive process of extensive restructuring the existing Roads or building a new by-pass of some kind – if that indeed remains possible by that time.

My views and approach to the JCS are well known by Residents and I take no pleasure from seeing the chaos which this flawed Strategy is causing to Communities right across Tewkesbury Borough, even before it actually comes into being.

I, like a number of other Tewkesbury Borough Councillors made clear at a variety of points in the process that the best solution for Residents was a Strategy which focused on the Borough – not least of all because of the delays which would inevitably be caused by working with two other Authorities which themselves had much more to gain by drawing out the process for as long as it takes for them to get the best solution to their own Development problems. That unnecessarily delayed process which is being used as a significant window of opportunity by Developers continues, and it seems to be all at the cost of Residents in Tewkesbury Borough and the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward in particular.

We can only hope that when these Proposals reach the Borough Planning Committee, they are rejected on the basis of what has already been promised by this Policy, and in the case of the Development North of the Camp, held back until such time as the Community will not be expected to experience perhaps years of inconvenience and enhanced levels of danger because the infrastructure doesn’t exist that will lead to Residents experiencing otherwise.

 

 

Starveall Farm: Planning Policy and the centrally-derived system of deferral, qualification and elimination is putting Local Planning Decisions in the hands of bureaucrats and gives a lie to Localism…

Pamington Residents await Members of Tewkesbury Borough Council's Planning Committee on 4th February 2014.  Members Granted Planning on a majority of 9 to 8

Pamington Residents await Members of Tewkesbury Borough Council’s Planning Committee on 4th February 2014. Committee Members Granted Planning on a majority of 9 to 8

‘Localism is nothing but words’ is a phrase that many people living in Pamington will no doubt be using for a considerable time to come after Tewkesbury Borough’s Planning Committee voted by a narrow margin earlier today to permit the construction of a Chicken ‘Farm’ at Starveall.

After a lengthy debate in which nearly all Members of the Planning Committee asked questions, commented or debated the Plan, it was clear that the decision would be close.

Pamington Residents who attended and commented to me afterwards had not expected to hear 2 different Members tell the Committee that there was in effect no point in objecting because the Plan would go through on Appeal anyway. They had certainly not expected to see some Members of the Committee choosing not to vote and I can certainly understand why they were frustrated and felt completely let down when the Decision was then made on a majority of 9 votes to 8.

I have made little secret of my concerns about the arbitrary nature of the Planning System and the way that a centrally derived policy of deferral, qualification or elimination can effectively dismiss the decisions of Local Planning Committees themselves.

But irrespective of what different Government Agencies, Authorities or NGO’s have to say regarding their very subjective views concerning the relationship of proposals with their own Policies, the reality is that no voter or member of public – who doesn’t have knowledge of the System –  is expecting any decision but that of the people they Elected to represent them, to carry the overwhelming weight in a Planning Decision. Circumstances that would actually reflect localism in their literal sense if not its truest form when borne out.

Having followed the Plans for this Site since I first received documents outlining the proposal from the Applicant’s Agent in 2012, through Parish Council and Public Meetings, right up until I attended the Site Inspection Panel Meeting on the 23rd of January, I had no doubt that I would speak when the time for a Decision came, and this is what I said to the Planning Committee this morning:

“It would to my knowledge be quite correct to state that other than the Applicant himself, Residents and Businesses from the area are universally against this application and what it represents in terms of the blight on the landscape, the environmental considerations, the potential related impact upon flood issues in the locality and beyond, and the access issues which all accompany a sizeable commercial project which is unquestionably profit led.

Let me be clear in saying that I am not against business, commerce or any private enterprise doing the best that it can with the resources that are available to make the very best of the opportunities that are open to it. I am however against any enterprise doing so when there will be a direct and negative impact upon the quality of living for others or a potentially serious escalation in the threat of injury or harm to the public which cannot be justified for any purpose other than for a savvy business to make money and because distantly set central government legislation simply allows them to do so.

Many of us are simply struggling to understand how the junction from Pamington Lane on to the A46 by Ashchurch Camp can be considered to be safe for the access and egress of what may be some of the biggest heavy goods vehicles which are permitted on the UK’s roads without very specific exemptions. Members will have surely noted the pictures provided by residents of a vehicle of similar size and proportion pictured to these at this junction which is on a stretch of road as notorious for existing safety concerns as it is for the accompanying traffic volume issues which I understand may already be critical to the viability of several high profile sites in the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward within an implemented JCS.

Put simply, nobody who knows this site locally believes this junction is safe for this kind of commercial traffic to access Pamington even now, and that’s before absolutely anything else gets built.

The rising volumes of traffic on the A46 which will inevitably come with the developments that residents in this Ward are having to contemplate even without including the proposal here today will make serious accidents all the more likely, and that is before the introduction of what will be heavy goods vehicle manoeuvres of a seriously traffic flow-obstructing and visibility reducing nature.

Surely Members will recognise that local knowledge; what is in effect situational objectivity, and common sense must override the tick-box, distant and highly subjective approach which is arguably being employed by the Highways Agency who – let’s face it, are not best known for their touchy-feely nature or for employing any discernible level of collaboration with key stakeholders.

Take any allowance given to the emotional buy-in that will remove value from the arguments of local people and the fact still remains that neither this Junction nor Pamington Lane are suited to the proposed level of heavy goods traffic use which will come with Planning being approved and would therefore be likely to suffer a significant reduction in road safety for all users as a result.

Before I conclude, I believe that it should also be of great concern to this Committee that by granting approval to this application, I understand that Members will also grant de-facto approval for the construction of an extensive roadway to the site with no less than 5 passing places between Pamington lane and the farm, which are sufficient to accommodate vehicles of such a size.

Such permission will see the destruction of what is arguably little more than an historic green lane which has existed and given pleasure to local people for many generations. I now understand that approval will lead it to be bulldozed and gravelled over simply because it is a public right of way and because Gloucestershire Highways can authorise such a construction for its entire length and up to a width of 30 Feet at any point, should they choose to do so. What exactly is fair to everyone but the applicant about that?

Mr Chairman, I appreciate very well how the Planning system works and the interpretive nature of the Members responsibility which is all too often misinterpreted by those who innocently perceive that the buck always stops within these four walls.

However, applications such as this illustrate just how flawed a system is that has the ability to allow applications like this to gain approval just because planning is effectively based on a London-generated, one size fits all mentality.

The reality is that whilst different, to the residents of Pamington, building a chicken farm at Starvall is as real as the threat from building on floodplain to residents living in Tewkesbury Town or building on the Greenbelt to people who have homes around Churchdown.  Local people are expecting local decisions to reflect this.

I ask all of you to consider what I have said closely and to reject this Application, which is not in the interests of the majority of the people who reside, work, run businesses or travel through this parish and is not in the interests of the people who already have homes and lives in this ward or in the future may do so.”

I remain firmly of the view that local issues that only affect local people should be dealt with at local level, unless there is a matter of genuine national interest which overrides them.

Sadly and most regrettably, this didn’t happen today.

Adam’s related Blogs:

Flooding: A truly democratic system should allow for changes in Planning Legislation which will limit the damage which future flooding events have the power to cause

A Chicken Farm in Pamington may suit the needs of one business, but will do little to bolster the quality of life for anybody else living there

A new Sainsburys for Ashchurch could be a great addition to the local economy; but a development like this needs to consider each aspect of the impact it will have on the lives and businesses it will affect and not just the effort it takes their customers to shop.

Sainsburys proposal to build a new store off Junction 9 of the M5 on the A46 at Ashchurch has certainly started to stir the thoughts of many in the area and not least of all amongst Residents within the Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff Ward which borders the site.

With significant housing development sites proposed within the Options of the ‘Preferred Option for a Joint Core Strategy’ (JCS) in the area, some could argue that Sainsburys are undertaking a timely and highly opportune step. Others are already drawing battle lines upon the damage which they speculate such a store would inflict upon the businesses and economy of central Tewkesbury and it is perfectly natural that such concerns need not only to be aired, but considered properly too.

As a local Elected Member, I am concerned about the impact that such a Store would have upon the lives of people living within my Ward, but also recognise that there would also be many advantages to the development coming to the area, not least in terms of the reduced travel requirement for the many local people who currently shop at the Tewkesbury Road Store on the A4019 in Cheltenham – a point not lost upon Sainsburys themselves, who readily placed information boards about the Project for their customers within the entrance of that Store.

Perhaps my biggest concern right now would be the public perception that the JCS will be adopted and that as such, the closure of Ashchurch Camp is not only a foregone conclusion, but also imminent – which at the time of publishing this Blog, it most definitely is not – and that nearby Fiddington is also sure to become host to yet another urban sprawl of the soulless nature you need only travel a few miles to witness at the North of Bishops Cleeve in the Homelands Developments.

Whilst there is a big question to be answered regarding the continuing growth in out-of-town supermarkets, I am considering this specific Proposal in terms of its impact upon the immediate area itself and therefore in isolation, rather than as part of the considerably more complicated issue of retail market share, the growth of supermarket chains and what this will mean for us all in the future. I will perhaps talk about this in a different entry.

On a practical level, study the Plans which Sainsburys have submitted to Tewkesbury Borough Council and you will quickly note that proposed changes to the A46 could create absolute mayhem with the construction of a roundabout which is clearly planned with more focus upon entry to the Store than it is in consideration of the flow of traffic in either direction.

With the Plans making no mention on the impact of additional traffic and a questionable change to traffic flow on an already difficult staggered Northway and Fiddington junction with the A46 – only part of which is light controlled – one has to wonder just how much consideration has been given to the already hideous traffic problems that we already experience, not least of all since the Highways Agency added light-controls onto Junction 9 making peak-time travel in the area a monotonous task to say the least.

On the upside, the addition of a Supermarket which really has been thought out in terms of its impact upon local infrastructure and the wider community would also bring a variety of benefits to a customer base which would go way beyond Tewkesbury and in all likelihood bring shoppers to the area who would not currently travel there and perhaps leave the M5 for any other reason.

With fuel prices keeping us all very concerned, the arrival of a new Petrol Station opposite the BP Site would certainly drive local prices down and potentially create other opportunities for smaller businesses to attract the passing custom into Tewkesbury itself which will be drawn to such a facility.

Those concerned about businesses in Tewkesbury could well be right about a loss of jobs and business closures and neither event would be one that I would wish to see in any event. But a Sainsburys in Ashchurch would arguably facilitate a massive net gain in employment, not least of all for those people seeking part-time work that may currently be impractical to consider with a shortage of this type of work available on such a scale locally.

Looking at the Plans and what they will mean for local people, on balance, a Sainsburys which has been built in consideration of its impact on the wider community – and not just within a few yards of the front gate, could well prove to be a significant boost for the area.

Whilst there are questions that require answers and issues to be resolved, working with the Company now to address these concerns to the satisfaction and mutual gain of all would perhaps be a very sensible plan indeed. It is after all in Sainsburys interests to be seen to support the communities which ‘feed’ custom into it’s Stores and Tewkesbury Town businesses could do a lot worse than to discuss the role of a new Store within the local economy in parallel with the Application Process, even as they make their arguments for its rejection.

As a local Borough Councillor representing Ashchurch with Walton Cardiff, it is in fact Highways issues that concern me most of all as the Application goes forward. I see nothing good coming to the Residents I represent from the road changes as they have so far been proposed and would go as far to say that it would not be good news for anyone who uses the A46 and roads that join from the Business Parks, from Fiddington, Northway or in fact Tewkesbury itself.

If Sainsburys are serious about winning support, they will have to raise their game considerably in considering the traffic and community issues that its construction would generate and demonstrate to us all that they have done so. The Store could prove be a great addition to the local economy; but a development like this needs to consider each aspect of the impact it will have on the lives and businesses it will affect and not just the effort it takes their customers to shop.